Thursday, April 29, 2010

Friday Roundup—Texas Sweethearts Style

The Texas Sweethearts hope you had a great week!

In case you missed it this week, our Featured Sweetheart was Melissa Buron! Melissa has made a lifetime out of a love of books, reading and writing!

Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts!

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Texas Sweetheart Jessica Lee Anderson was thrilled to discover this book trailer made for her middle grade novel TRUDY!



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And on the video front, Sweetheart P. J. Hoover had a birthday this week (a big one) and made this video to celebrate.



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In review news, Jessica Lee Anderson received a fantastic review from Teens Read Too for BORDER CROSSING! Thank you, Teens Read Too!

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Press release from Bethany Hegedus, Co-Editor of Hunger Mountain

The 2010 Katherine Paterson Prize Deadlines and Judge Announced.

Bestselling author Holly Black will be the 2010 judge of the Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing at Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts.

The Katherine Paterson prize was launched last year to honor writers of young adult and children’s literature. Writers may enter young adult and middle grade writing and writing for young children. Entries may be short stories or novel excerpts.
There is a $20 entry fee, and the postmark deadline is June 30, 2010. There is a $1000 prize for the winning entry, and three runners-up receive $100. The winner and the runners-up are all published on Hunger Mountain online.
Complete guidelines may be found here.

*****

If you're in the Austin area, and happen to be near the Arboretum Barnes & Noble this Saturday from 2-4, PLEASE stop by and see Sweetheart P. J. Hoover. She'll be doing a reading and then signing books. Is this the best book display ever or what (well, PJ thinks it is)?


May is shaping up to be another great month! Here are all the places we'll be for May:

May 1, 2010 - PJ Hoover Booksigning at Barnes & Noble 2:00pm, Austin, TX

May 4, 2010 - PJ Hoover author visit at Jollyville Elementary School, Austin, TX

May 12, 2010 - PJ Hoover author visit at Barbara Jordan Elementary School, Austin, TX

May 15, 2010 - Writing Workshop, Austin, TX

May 20, 2010 - Jessica Lee Anderson as the DAR Keynote/Annual Luncheon

May 25-28, 2010 - Jessica Lee Anderson and PJ Hoover at BookExpo America (BEA) in New York
Thursday, May 27, 2010, 11:00-12:00: PJ signing in Booth 3777

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Here we Sweethearts are at one of our very favorite places for lunch. (can you name the place?)


Have a great weekend!

*Note: If there is something you'd like us to include in our Friday roundup, please email us. We're happy to include news and information about the awesomeness of the kidlit world!

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

FEATURED SWEETHEART: Melissa Buron

The Texas Sweethearts are thrilled to have Melissa Buron as our Featured Sweetheart this week. Those of you in Texas may be familiar with Melissa, or you may have seen her spreading goodness across the Internet, too!

Bio:

After surviving a childhood spent at suburban malls in northwest Houston, I escaped to Africa and then Europe to teach in various international schools. During my stay overseas I acquired one husband and two children. We now live in Texas where I work as a teacher and writer.


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TXS: You run an impressive blog, the Book Addict. Can you tell us a little bit about the blog, and what your goals for it are? Can you tell us a bit about the author interviews you do?

MB: Book Addict evolved from my column The Author Next Door that appears in the Houston Banner newspaper. In my newspaper column, I interview authors who live in Texas with a huge emphasis on writers for young people. It’s been a lot of fun learning from other author about what inspires them as well as their writing and research processes. On my blog Book Addict I include as well interviews from authors outside of the Lone Star State, my own work, publishing news and sometimes a rant or two.


TXS: In addition to being a writer, you also are a mom, teacher and previously were a librarian. What are your secrets to time management and goal setting?

MB: In between teaching, the newspaper, the blog and my fiction projects my schedule is intense. Add my family into the mix and things often reach a fever pitch. I’d love to say that I had a great system or a secret technique for time management but the truth is that many (most!) days I run around like a chicken with its head cut off. I wrote a blog post on time management recently and came to the conclusion that I needed to devote myself to a few of the very most important things in my life. So I set my priorities as my kids, my husband and my writing. Everything else I have to let myself do half-assed. If not, I make myself crazy. Not a perfect or elegant process but the only one I’ve found that works for me.


TXS: What is the biggest surprise you've had since you started reaching out to other authors?

MB: My biggest surprise is that not matter how successful the author, the truth remains that writing as a career choice is challenging and not for the faint of heart. I’ve interviewed major award winners as well as debutantes to publishing and they all face the same challenges of rejection, criticism and self-doubt.

The difference between a successful author and a dilettante isn’t talent, but stamina. If you dig in your heels and commit your life to the craft of writing, eventually you will be successful. You only fail if you quit.


TXS: How do you think reading for kids has changed over the years? People talk so much about kids needing to share their attention with texting, TV, and video games. Is the challenge greater now for getting kids to read?

MB: I think that the greatest challenge is not getting kids to read, but making sure that they have the books available to them. I teach in a school where many of the students’ families do not have either the money to buy books or transportation to get to a public library. If kids grow-up in an environment without access to books, they don’t grow-up as readers. The shortage of books for these children is a bigger hindrance to reading than television or video games.


TXS: If you could make a wish for kids and reading in the future, what would it be?

MB: I have to stop at just one? What about three – like in stories?

Wish 1
I truly believe that we are now in a golden age for Children’s and Young Adult literature so one of my wishes is that publishing houses continue to produce high quality books for young people.

Wish 2
My second wish for all children is that they grow-up in homes with piles and piles of books.

Wish 3
My final wish is that every kid has someone (a teacher, parent or friend) with which to share their piles of books.

And of course that they live happily ever after.




TXS: Thank you, Melissa! We are so happy to feature you!

*****

Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts.

Monday, April 26, 2010

Texas Sweethearts Writing Tip—STAYING CONNECTED

From Texas Sweetheart Jessica Lee Anderson, we have today's writing tip focusing on STAYING CONNECTED!

Enjoy!



Happy Week from The Texas Sweethearts!

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

FEATURED SWEETHEART - Sara Kelly Johns


The Texas Sweethearts had the pleasure of meeting the enthusiastic, energetic, experienced, and FUN Sara Kelly Johns at TLA in San Antonio. She’s incredibly generous, and she’s campaigning for ALA President. For more information about her campaign, check out her site.

The vote ends at midnight on Friday, April 23rd.


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TXS: What inspired you to become a librarian, and what (or who) keeps you inspired?

SKJ: My wise mother, a first-grade teacher, worked as a school librarian for two summer schools and told me, "This is your career, Sara. You love working with people, enjoy kids and love learning." I didn't always listen to my mother up to this point in my life, but I was a junior in college, an English major looking at grad school, spent some time in the Campus School library with the incredible librarian, Nilah Hausdorf, and was hooked. I have the best job in the school and love the connections to all libraries that are part of the profession. What keeps me inspired are the kids and teachers when the "light" goes on from the student selecting the right book and telling me how much it matters and students and teachers really appreciating just the right app or just the right resource to answer questions.



TXS: What led you to become a candidate for ALA president, and what do you hope to accomplish?

SKJ: I decided to run for ALA President because I experienced how effective ALA could be when the staff and volunteer members worked together. ALA can make a difference for libraries, librarians, library workers and the people who use libraries. While I was AASL President in 2007-08, I lead the involvement of AASL and ALA with the amazing "Spokane Moms" (http://www.fundourfuturewashington.org/) to get new legislation passed in Washington State to fund school libraries. That fit with my long-time involvement in advocacy and library issues but it worked better than I had ever experienced because ALA was involved with citizen coalitions to make a difference for libraries. The decision was hard but the tipping point was one of my Mansfield University online students who, when we were examining the ALA Code of Ethics, wrote a passionate forum post describing her reaction: "I get it now. I know what it means to be part of the profession of librarianship. And now I can explain to others who ask, "Why on earth would you want to be a librarian?" Whew!


TXS: Have there been any surprises as a candidate?

SKJ: Many. I was always one of the people that said, "Tear the silos in ALA (divisions and committees working independently of each other) down." I know more can be accomplished when working together instead of separately. But, as I made the 32 speeches in 4 days at the Midwinter ALA conference in Boston, I saw the passion and expertise that people have for "their" part of ALA and now I am more, "Let's have some flexible walls for those silos and/or doors that make it easier to work together." I want to encourage the synergy of the divisions and committees working cooperatively but, in the reorganization that is being discussed, I don't want to lose the passion of the people who volunteer to make a difference for their part of the profession. I also was again surprised by the universality of the problems of different library types along with the unique issues and concerns of each type. And, I loved meeting authors as I traveled around who are ready to be a core of advocates for libraries. That is such a good idea that needs to happen.



TXS: Could you share some of your most rewarding experiences?

SKJ: As a librarian, I have had many rewards but notable is the chance I've had to steer kids to read books that make a difference for them, especially teens struggling with sexual identity or dysfunctional families. And hearing a kid say, "Thanks for telling me about that book. It's the first one I have read all the way through. What should I read next?" As an activist librarian, I mentioned working with the Spokane Moms but it's also the experience of working on statewide commissions and boards, seeing legislators, decision-makers and the public understand the impact libraries have on life.


TXS: What is your dream for libraries and books in the future?

SKJ: Libraries have become community centers for literacy and a "third space" for people to use resources and to learn. This is true for all library types--public, school and academic. Since I read in all formats from the printed books to MP3 files, my dream for libraries is to have flexible, functional facilities available for all people and equitable, generous funding to provide whatever type of reading someone wants, delivered every possible way. More, more, more! My favorite quote during National Library Week was from author Neil Gaiman, "It's still National Library Week. You should be especially nice to a librarian today, or tomorrow. Sometime this week, anyway. Probably the librarians would like tea. Or chocolates. Or a reliable source of funding."

Libraries do so much with so little that adequate facilities and funding everywhere would matter so incredibly! Sitting in a park, accessing the library on the ubiquitous wi-fi public network, finishing a book on my e-reader, searching the library's catalog for another book, listening or viewing the recommendations from others who have read it, listening to an author's podcast about a book, chatting with the librarian about the varied choices, downloading one and settling in with a smile on my face to continue the adventure. That happens already for a few; in my dream it happens for everyone.


TXS: Thank you, Sara! We were so honored to feature you!


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Bio:

Sara Kelly Johns has been the school library media specialist for grades 6-12 at Lake Placid (NY) Middle/High School since 1999, supervising the Lake Placid elementary school library for the first two years. Previous to that, she was the school librarian for middle/senior high level at Beekmantown Middle/Senior High School in Plattsburgh, NY.

From 1990-2006, she was an adjunct professor for the mandated 1-credit undergraduate Library Research Methods through Technology course at SUNY Plattsburgh’s Feinberg Library and won the “Excellence in Teaching” Award for Adjuncts in 1999 as well as the sixth annual “Award for Excellence in Library Service” from the North Country Reference and Research Resources (3’R’s) Council in 1996. Currently, she is teaching as an adjunct for the NCATE accredited School Library & Information Technology (SL&IT) program at Mansfield University for their Access and Legal Issues (censorship, intellectual freedom, copyright) course.

She was the 2007-08 American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Past President, is the Associate Editor for AASL Community for Knowledge Quest, and is the AASL Coordinator in New York State for implementation of the AASL Standards for 21st Century Learner. Her new term as an ALA Councilor at Large began at Midwinter in Boston; her first term was 2004-06. She was a member of ALA President’s Jim Rettig’s advocacy initiative advisory committee, the ALA Advocacy Committee and is currently a member of ALA President Camila Alire’s REACT committee for her advocacy initiative for frontline library workers. She is also a candidate for ALA president and knows what “running” for president really means.

Sara has presented extensively at state, regional and national school library conferences on advocacy, leadership, plagiarism prevention and AASL. She has written professional articles for LMC, School Library Journal, Knowledge Quest and Teacher Librarian and will lead her first webinar on Collection Development for Linworth in October. At the recent ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, she was the school library panelist for the Reference Books Bulletin’s “Defending the Reference Collection” program. Upcoming presentations will be Oct. 3 at the School Library Journal Summit on Librarians as Leaders of 21st Century Learning
and a panel October 6, “High School to College: The Information Literacy Gap.”

She was a member and president of the Saranac Lake Free Library Board of Trustees and served on the Plattsburgh (NY) Public Library Board of Trustees before moving to Saranac Lake in 1991. She served on the Regents Commission on Library Service for the 21st Century and is currently a member of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries, the New York Library Association (NYLA) Legislative Committee, the Intellectual Freedom roundtables for NYLA and ALA and the AASL Legislative Committee. She is an active member of and served two biennial terms as president of the local chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma international society of women educators.

In her spare time, she loves to garden, take digital snapshots, read crime novels and dances whenever she can, especially to her husband’s rock band, Double Axel. She has a son and four stepchildren, the cutest 5 and 7-year-old step-grandchildren there could be and almost 16,000 pictures on her personal Flickr account.


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Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts.

Sunday, April 18, 2010

The Texas Sweethearts at TLA 2010

Thursday and Friday, The Texas Sweethearts roadtripped down to San Antonio, Texas to take part in TLA 2010. Talk about an amazing time. Here's our photo wrap up of all the fun events!

First, Sweetheart Jo Whittemore posing with her book, FRONT PAGE FACE-OFF, at the Simon & Schuster booth. Yay, Jo!


Next up we have Sweetheart Jessica Lee Anderson getting ready for her booksigning. Jessica was signing copies of both BORDER CROSSING and TRUDY!


Here we are posing before our Texas Sweetheart reception. We had candy, sweet treats, and information about our books!

Jessica, Jo, and PJ

There is solid proof that if you provide cookies, brownies, and lemon bars, people will flock to your booth. We were swarmed and had a blast at our reception!


After the reception and trying to decide the best method to get to the publisher/author party.

Jessica, E. Kristen Anderson, Jo, and K. A. Holt

Walking in the rain to the party...

PJ and Jessica

At the party, there were tons of way cool authors!

Jessica, Lisa Schroeder, and PJ

Okay, a word from us Sweethearts:
Librarian conventions are the best, and TLA is the best of the best. So if you ever get the chance to go, do it!

And have a great week!

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

FEATURED SWEETHEART - Agent Jenn Laughran

We're so excited to feature Jenn Laughran this week here on THE TEXAS SWEETHEARTS blog. Jenn is an agent at the Andrea Brown Literary Agency and a bookseller and goes out of her way to offer her advice and support online to so many writers (not to mention she is also Sweetheart Jo Whittemore's agent). She is amazing and is a true sweetheart in our eyes!


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TXS: You’re a bookseller and an agent, which is enough of a juggle, but you also host Not Your Mothers Book Club AND run chat after Tuesday KidLitChats AND answer questions on Absolute Write forum AND constantly tweet about your clients AND return their calls and emails. HOW???

JL: It isn't so hard. I just have two jobs. I am an agent (which means that talking to and about my clients comes with the territory!), and I help out with children's & teen events at the bookstore (which is where the book club comes in). I prefer jobs that have a lot of different tasks to do all the time so I don't get bored, so these things suit me.

Meanwhile, the online chats and answering questions are an extension of my agenty work, and while I don't have to do them, I do find them fun. If I didn't have time, or didn't want to do them, I would stop. :-)


TXS: Have you ever felt a client was right about a manuscript and the editor was wrong? If so, how have you handled the situation?

JL: Usually an editor wants a change made, not just for the sake of making a change, or to mess with you, but for a reason. The edit is merely a suggestion of how you might get the desired result.

If an author steps back and gives it some time, they will realize that it is almost always the result that the editor wants, and it doesn't much matter how you get it. For example, your editor might say: Character Y is coming off as robotic. Can you make him cry here? You hear: Make Character Y into a crybaby! and you react badly. But the reality is, there are other ways to make Y seem less robotic... maybe we can brainstorm some of them, and you can get the result (Y less robotic) without having to do the thing that you don't want to do (make him a crybaby). Or maybe you could think of it as an experiment, just try it and see what happens - after all, we're in the computer age, you can always go back to the old version if you hate it.

If it was something seriously absurd though, and my author was worried enough to come to me to resolve it, then the editor and I would have a talk.


TXS: Going into more detail about the agent being an author advocate, I’ve known several people who have dropped agents because the relationship just wasn’t what they thought it would be. What, in your opinion, is the job of the agent, and what do you expect from your clients?

JL: First of all, I think it is really important to note that authors and agents "break up" for all kinds of reasons, and it doesn't mean that the agent is bad, or the author is bad... it just means that it didn't work. It is NOT the same as getting a divorce, it does NOT mean that you'll never get published, and it does NOT mean that that agent is a criminal of some kind... it just means that it didn't work, and that is OK. I say this because I know how fraught with drama the whole process of getting an agent is and I try to demystify as much as I can.

I'm an advocate for you and your books. That means of course that I have to be able to communicate with you well. I expect that to go both ways - quick and clear communication is important to me. I also expect hard work, and I will do my best to give the same. And let's have fun, skip the drama and just make some beautiful kids books. If this isn't a great job, I don't know what is!


TXS: Working as a bookseller, you get to see firsthand what readers are going for and what they’re asking to see more of. Does that effect you as an agent (be it acquiring clients, suggesting new projects, etc)?

JL: Definitely. I think I have a slightly different perspective than most people, because I am seeing trends from the very very beginning all the way through to point of purchase, and I get to see how what we imagine from behind the scenes really works or doesn't work in the real world. It's cool, and I think useful for my agenting.


TXS: With publisher purse strings tightening in this economy, what is an effective, affordable way an author can promote him or herself?

JL: I definitely think it is important for authors to be proactive about their own publicity efforts. If you are the kind of person who likes to blog / tweet / facebook - DO IT! If you are great at talking to kids, work up some school presentations and hit the road. If you are a homebody, at least make some postcards or bookmarks and send them out to bookstores, and have a website. If you don't do anything, you won't get anything.


TXS: And finally a bit o’ fun… We all hear tales of agents getting strange things along with a writer’s submission (nude photos, candy, coupons, etc). What is the strangest thing you’ve gotten in the mail from a writer?

JL: Well, I've never accepted mail slush, so I haven't had much in the way of experience with this phenomena. But I have gotten a few offbeat emails, one of which I remember distinctly and can only be described as... Hardcore Merporn.

And no, I don't represent that.


TXS: Thank you, Jenn! We were so happy to feature you!

*****

Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts.


Sunday, April 11, 2010

Texas Sweethearts Writing Tip—A PEEK AT REVISIONS

From Texas Sweetheart Jo Whittemore, we have today's writing tip focusing on REVISIONS! It's a perfect glimpse into her newly received revision letter for her latest book sale.

Enjoy!



Happy Week from The Texas Sweethearts!

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Friday Roundup—Texas Sweethearts Style

We're looking forward to TLA next week! All three Texas Sweethearts will be in attendance, so look for us, and if you happen to see one of us, please say "Hi!" And ask us for candy. After all, anything sweet makes life better :)

In case you missed it this week, our Featured Sweetheart was Pat McCarthy! Pat is a high school English and Creative Writing teacher, and we loved getting some insight into the high school mind!

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For your chance to win a copy of BORDER CROSSING by Sweetheart Jessica Lee Anderson, visit PJ Hoover's interview with Jessica and comment on the post. The contest will be open until Sunday, April 18th, 2010.

*****

Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts!

*****

Press release from Bethany Hegedus, Co-Editor of Hunger Mountain

The 2010 Katherine Paterson Prize Deadlines and Judge Announced.

Bestselling author Holly Black will be the 2010 judge of the Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing at Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts.

The Katherine Paterson prize was launched last year to honor writers of young adult and children’s literature. Writers may enter young adult and middle grade writing and writing for young children. Entries may be short stories or novel excerpts.
There is a $20 entry fee, and the postmark deadline is June 30, 2010. There is a $1000 prize for the winning entry, and three runners-up receive $100. The winner and the runners-up are all published on Hunger Mountain online.
Complete guidelines may be found here.

*****

TAKE A CHANCE ON ART: 2010 Disaster Relief Raffle

Big white mouse and little brown mouse are tending a garden of flowers on the May pages in Susan L. Roth’s charming board book for preschoolers, My Love for You All Year Round (Dial, 2004). The original artwork for this spread, donated by the artist for the 2010 Texas Library Disaster Relief Raffle, is a multi-layered collage of colored and textured papers rich in color, shading, and detail.

The raffle will be held on Friday, April 16, during the second general session of the TLA Annual Conference in San Antonio. Tickets are available online (mail by Monday, April 9)and will be sold onsite at the spring conference: $5 each or 5 for $20.

Take a chance on art and improve the chances that your library association can help Texas libraries recover from natural disasters.

*****

The Texas Sweethearts are looking forward to participating in Operation Teen Book Drop. It's coming up April 15, 2010, and you can read all about it here. Why not think about participating yourself?


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Here are all the places we'll be for April:

April 9-11, 2010 - Jessica Lee Anderson at the Texas Mountain Trail Writers Annual Retreat

April 14-17, 2010 - Jo Whittemore, Jessica Lee Anderson, and PJ Hoover at Texas Library Association Conference (TLA) in San Antonio, TX

Jessica and PJ will both be signing, and there will be a Texas Sweethearts reception at 3:00 on Thursday, April 15th, at the Milkweed Editions booth.

*****

Have a great weekend!

*Note: If there is something you'd like us to include in our Friday roundup, please email us. We're happy to include news and information about the awesomeness of the kidlit world!

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

FEATURED SWEETHEART - Pat McCarthy

We're very excited to have Pat McCarthy, a High School English and Creative Writing teacher from Woodstock, Virginia, this week as our Featured Sweetheart. On Sweetheart PJ Hoover's recent visit to Virginia, she visited with Pat's Creative Writing class.

Here's his bio:

Patrick is in his 15th year of teaching high school English at Central High School in Woodstock, VA. He is married to his beautiful wife Sharon McCarthy (a published author). He has two children and a dog that is going for the world record for longevity. Patrick is currently working on his MA in English and is a proud teacher consultant of the National Writing Project.



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TXS: It's been a while since I've been in high school. Can you tell us a little about what it's like to teach high school English these days?

PM: It's probably in some ways much like you remember it. In fact some of your teachers from high school are probably still teaching. It's still a fun place, albeit very difficult at times, to work.



TXS: In addition to English, you also teach a Creative writing class. What is the structure of your class like, and what are your visions for the kids? Also how did you come to teaching the class?

PM: Creative writing class is a creative person's dream. Whatever you think up you can try in the classroom. I want my students to be exposed to as many different styles and genres of writing as possible, but within that I want them to find a genre and/or style that works best for them. I want them to feel like they are writers. Ultimately, I want the class to feel like a community of writers, writers that want to improve their craft.

I took over the position three years ago when a wonderful teacher stepped down for retirement. I had big shoes to fill, but I was ecstatic to have the opportunity to give it a go. I have to admit it was a little scary at first.



TXS: What is the biggest surprise you've had since you started teaching English and Creative Writing?

PM: The biggest surprise to me was seeing so much concentrated talent in one place. Moreover, I was and am still surprised by how willing the students are to try new things. There is very little coaxing necessary. Most students are on board from day one. And at this point the students realize that they are in a pretty special place. I know I do.



TXS: How do you think writing for kids has changed over the years? People talk so much about kids needing to share their attention with texting, TV, and video games. Is the challenge greater now for getting kids interested in writing and is writing more popular?

PM: Teenagers are definitely using writing in some unorthodox ways, but the allure of writing is still very strong. The fact that Twilight and Harry Potter have been so popular with teen and preteens has kept a large segment of the teen population interested in recreational reading. And obviously reading for fun can be a great steppingstone for students who want to step out into writing. Given the opportunity to explore the different possibilities of writing and to find some success is still a large part of the process. Peter Elbow, an extremely important voice in the teaching of writing, has a book entitled Everyone Can Write. I really believe this to be true.


TXS: If you could make a wish for kids and writing in the future, what would it be?

PM: My wish would be for every student to have the opportunity to write at least one thing that they are proud of and share it with someone else. Each day I have the opportunity to show students that they are writers and that they have something valuable to say. I would like to ask a question to end my comments. Who was the first person that told you that you were a writer? If you have never had someone tell you this, let me be the one.


TXS: Thank you, Pat! We are thrilled to feature you!

*****

Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts.

Monday, April 5, 2010

Texas Sweethearts Writing Tip—TIME MANAGEMENT

From Texas Sweetheart PJ Hoover, we have today's writing tip focusing on that oh-so-important-thing: TIME MANAGEMENT.

We give you Two Tips for Time Management.



Happy Week from The Texas Sweethearts!

Friday, April 2, 2010

Friday Roundup—Texas Sweethearts Style

Happy Friday from The Texas Sweethearts! Just a short roundup since it's a long weekend here...


Thank you to all who helped with our Library Loving Blog Challenge! We were able to make a $50 donation to THE READING TUB!


In case you missed it this week, our Featured Sweetheart was Verla Kay! She had some great things to say, and we were honored to feature her!

*****

Please email us your nominations for featured sweethearts!

*****

Press release from Bethany Hegedus, Co-Editor of Hunger Mountain

The 2010 Katherine Paterson Prize Deadlines and Judge Announced.

Bestselling author Holly Black will be the 2010 judge of the Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing at Hunger Mountain: the VCFA Journal of the Arts.

The Katherine Paterson prize was launched last year to honor writers of young adult and children’s literature. Writers may enter young adult and middle grade writing and writing for young children. Entries may be short stories or novel excerpts.
There is a $20 entry fee, and the postmark deadline is June 30, 2010. There is a $1000 prize for the winning entry, and three runners-up receive $100. The winner and the runners-up are all published on Hunger Mountain online.
Complete guidelines may be found here.

*****

TAKE A CHANCE ON ART: 2010 Disaster Relief Raffle

Big white mouse and little brown mouse are tending a garden of flowers on the May pages in Susan L. Roth’s charming board book for preschoolers, My Love for You All Year Round (Dial, 2004). The original artwork for this spread, donated by the artist for the 2010 Texas Library Disaster Relief Raffle, is a multi-layered collage of colored and textured papers rich in color, shading, and detail.

The raffle will be held on Friday, April 16, during the second general session of the TLA Annual Conference in San Antonio. Tickets are available online (mail by Monday, April 9)and will be sold onsite at the spring conference: $5 each or 5 for $20.

Take a chance on art and improve the chances that your library association can help Texas libraries recover from natural disasters.

*****

The Texas Sweethearts are looking forward to participating in Operation Teen Book Drop. It's coming up April 15, 2010, and you can read all about it here. Why not think about participating yourself?


*****

Here are all the places we'll be for April:

April 9-11, 2010 - Jessica Lee Anderson at the Texas Mountain Trail Writers Annual Retreat

April 14-17, 2010 - Jo Whittemore, Jessica Lee Anderson, and PJ Hoover at Texas Library Association Conference (TLA) in San Antonio, TX

Jessica and PJ will both be signing, and there will be a Texas Sweethearts reception at 3:00 on Thursday, April 15ht, at the Milkweed Editions booth.

*****

Have a great weekend!

*Note: If there is something you'd like us to include in our Friday roundup, please email us. We're happy to include news and information about the awesomeness of the kidlit world!